Thursday, December 16, 2004

ABOVE ALL I DERSIRE PEACE.

many people have questioned my stance on war.
I am not pro-war. i would wish that no one died in this war with Iraq, especially innocent victims. i am in fact pro-American with a Christian conscience.
i wish their was never another terrorist attack nor war in this world but i believe that is unavoidable. i want to be at peace with all men.
i agree with Mr. Arthur Holmes when he writes, "To call war anything less than evil would be self-deception. The Christian conscience has throughout history recognized the tragic character of war. The issue that tears the Christian conscience is not whether war is good, but whether it is in all cases avoidable."(1)
but please note when Paul wrote in Romans
"If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men" (Rom. 12:18).
but sometimes it does not depend on you and that is when war comes into play.

'War and Sin
Whenever there is war, there are four elements that come together to determine the course of the conflict: government, military, the public, and technology. Behind these four elements of war there are many influences of which religious values (and in our case, Christianity) are only one factor. Yet religion in general, and Christianity specifically, has been a major factor in the history of warfare. There has not, however, been unanimity in the Christian response. While, as we will see, there has been a prevailing Christian perspective or Christian doctrine of war, there have been several Christian positions articulated on war. Each of these positions has a history and each of these positions has claimed biblical authority and support. War, just like any other biblical topic, has been subject to various interpretations. Just as there are various interpretations on war in the future (Armageddon), so also, are there various interpretations on war in the present.

The apostle Paul wrote, "If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men" (Rom. 12:18). Yet, history and headlines provide ample proof that "peace" cannot always be the Christian response to the evil that people and nations perpetrate. Before we can think theologically about the conduct of war and in war, we must think theologically about the cause of war. In short, we must consider war and the problem of evil. At the foundation of the Christian understanding of war is a belief in the fallen and broken nature of humanity--a belief that all of humanity and every aspect of personal and corporate life are marred by sin and original sin. Our sin nature corrupts international relations as well as interpersonal relations. War is ultimately a reflection of and consequence of sin. The Russian author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who was both a soldier and a political prisoner under the Stalin regime, said of the widespread effects of sin that "gradually it was discerned to me that the line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either--but right through every human heart." -see bottom for complete article

Wars are fought on the battlefields of the globe, but they are waged first in human heart. It is in this light that Christian philosopher Arthur Holmes writes, "To call war anything less than evil would be self-deception. The Christian conscience has throughout history recognized the tragic character of war. The issue that tears the Christian conscience is not whether war is good, but whether it is in all cases avoidable."(1)

Christians throughout history have recognized that the formulation of a doctrine of war or approach to war is a theological and biblical deduction based upon the interpretation of numerous passages in the Bible (cf. Eccles. 3:1, 8; Matt. 5:44; 24:6-7; Acts 10:1-23; Rom. 13:1-7; 1 Tim. 2:2; 1 Pet. 2:13-17). How those passages are interpreted determines the position that one holds. There is no "red letter" biblical doctrine of war. Thus the issue is not "what is the Bible's view of war" but, "what view best interprets and reflects the biblical passages regarding war?"

Critics of pacifism note that the principal problem with pacifism is that it misidentifies the morality of the individual as justification for (or morality of) the behavior of the state. At the other end, the principal problem with the crusade is that the church incorrectly identifies itself with the function of the state, and a theocratic one at that...

There is a Christian response to this tragedy but it must be understood and applied by all who seriously believe that the Bible speaks with authority today. What you believe is very important for it affects how you live. The apostle Paul encouraged us to pray "for kings and all who are in authority, in order that we may lead a quiet life in all godliness and dignity" (1 Tim. 2:2). His words speak directly to the issues of warfare, spirituality, and evangelism. As you read the headlines, watch the news, and consider war, do so from a biblical perspective. Christian responsibility is not an option for the disciple of Jesus Christ.'
-By Timothy J. Demy, Th.D.

I know that sometimes war is inevitable, war smears the bible. i dont believe we should go pick a fight, but i do believe we must defend our family and freedom.
-stephen




complete article http://www.leaderu.com/humanities/demy.html

1 comment:

me said...

i understand exactly what you're saying, it fits my opinions to a t.